A Mini-Post & Anthro News

Hominin herpes, European apes, and a fossilized spine

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Sometimes a lot of cool stuff happens between BS&M meetings. In an effort to keep up with the constant flow of science and to tide you over until our next discussion, we’re going to try to post mid-week mini-blogs and links to what we’re reading during the week.

This week, Google alerted me to another instance of possible between-species hanky-panky in the fossil record. In a new analysis, Underdown and colleagues attempted to figure out the most likely pathway through which humans got genital herpes (HSV2) from the ancestors of chimpanzees. Yes, you read that right. The closest relative of human HSV2 is not HSV1 (oral herpes), but ChHV1 (the chimpanzee version of herpes). The authors suggest that these two viral lineages split from one another between 1.4 and 3 million years ago, and that either Homo habilis got “proto-HSV2” from the ancestor of modern chimps and gave it to Paranthropus boisei, who then passed it on to Homo erectus, or P. boisei got it directly from the ancestor of modern chimps and transmitted it to H. erectus. (H. erectus is generally considered directly ancestral to Homo sapiens, which is why the virus only has to make it to that species to end up in us.)

Before things get too weird, I want to point out that the authors don’t think that the interspecific hanky-panky went down between either H. habilis or P. boisei and a member of the population of ancestral chimps. They suggest that hunting or scavenging meat from infected chimpanzees would have likely been enough to pass the virus on to one of the hominins, probably via chimp blood coming into contact with an open wound during the butchery process. Once “proto-HSV2” made it into H. habilis or P. boisei, however…

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Anyway. HSV2 now joins HPV (from Neanderthals) and body lice (from some archaic form of Homo) as evidence of ~close~ contact between humans and our hominin cousins (Reed et al. 2004, Pimenoff et al. 2017). The coolest thing about all of this research is that it’s not based directly on fossils or on ancient DNA; you can use things like the evolution of viruses to tell us about our own evolution. Awesome.

Read on for links to what we’ve been nerding out over this week and the references for the herpes paper.
Note: the featured photo is the OH5 cranium of Paranthropus boisei (credit: efossils.org)

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