Homo: What, Who, When, & Where?

Guest speaker: Dr. Bernard Wood (GWU)

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You guessed it, we had another guest speaker this Friday instead of our regularly scheduled BS&M meeting. No complaints here, though. This week’s speaker is a giant in the field of paleoanthropology: Dr. Bernard Wood of the Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology at George Washington University. Dr. Wood stopped by Rutgers to give us his thoughts on the last ~50 years worth of work on the origins of the genus Homo.

Instead of just writing a summary of his talk, I’m trying my hand at Storifying my tweets from the event. Check out the thread and let me know what you think about this format!

Next week, alas, still no BS&M (!), but check back here for ANOTHER defense update! Stan Kivai will be defending his dissertation on the effects of mechanical and nutritional properties on foraging in juvenile Tana River mangabeys. Fingers crossed that the snake is small!

Academic Family Trees

You may have noticed from literally all of the preceding posts that evolutionary anthropologists are into family trees. Who is related to what and how? Is Homo naledi the weird cousin at the family reunion or your great-great-great-great-grandhominin? The interest doesn’t stop at the relationships between fossil taxa; anthropologists are also into their own family trees – their academic family trees, that is.

A couple of years ago, some anthropologists from the University of Texas started the Academic Phylogeny of Physical Anthropology (physanthphylogeny.org) with the goal of tracing advisor-advisee relationships in our field. The tree now includes 2036 people (including me!) from 163 institutions and goes back to some of anthropology’s biggest names, like Louis Leakey, Earnest Hooton, and Franz Boas, to name a few. (Hooton has the most descendants, by far.)

But some of the folks on the tree also have some more unusual “ancestors” – people who weren’t anthropologists at all (like Nobel Prize winning biologist Nikolaas Tinbergen). I’m one of those people; my earliest ancestor to make it onto the tree is Dr. Glenn Jepsen, the first person to be appointed Sinclair Professor of Vertebrate Paleontology at Princeton University. He also served as the Curator of Vertebrate Paleontology and the Director of Princeton’s natural history museum. He worked on Paleocene/Eocene fossil mammals from South Dakota and Wyoming, including preparing and describing the earliest known definitive fossil bat Icaronycteris index.

icaronycteris index
Icaronycteris index Jepsen, 1966 – From the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History Collections website

That is one good-looking fossil bat. Anyway, what got me started writing this post is that, when I’m not shouting into the internet science void, I work as a collections technician at the New Jersey State Museum under the Curator of Natural History – who actually knew Jepsen! As Jepsen ran Princeton’s (now defunct) natural history museum and it was right down the road from the NJSM, there was naturally communication back and forth between Jepsen and various museum-affiliated people, some of which is still stored at the NJSM. Earlier this week, I found this amusing letter to him in a drawer of old correspondence:

Jepsen letter snip

“…and even the physical anthropologists,” indeed! Apparently we’re a tough crowd. Guess some things don’t change!

Thanks for reading! (And definitely check out physanthphylogeny.org)