Ghost Lineages Ride Again: the Spit Edition

Guest Blogger: Mareike Janiak

Darcy asked me to write a guest post on “the new spit paper” and it shows that she knows me well. Saliva? Salivary proteins? Functional genetic variation in those proteins? Possible interbreeding with mystery hominins? The microbiome?

Fav_things_gif.gif

The new spit paper” by Duo Xu and her colleagues is titled “Archaic hominin introgression in Africa contributes to functional salivary MUC7 genetic variation” and is going to be published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.

The authors looked at genetic variation in a gene called MUC7, which codes for mucin 7, a protein that is only found in saliva. In an earlier study, they found that the number of times a specific part of the MUC7 gene is repeated varies across different primate species. In gorillas it is repeated only 4-5 times, while vervet monkeys have 11-12 repeats. Humans have 5-6 repeats, but the gene hadn’t been thoroughly investigated in our own species, which is where the current paper comes in.

One known function of mucin 7 is to bind with bacteria in the mouth, so one question the authors asked is whether genetic variation in MUC7 correlates with the type of bacteria found in a person’s mouth. Using data from the Human Microbiome Project the authors found that people that have more similarity in the MUC7 gene also have more similar bacterial profiles (microbiomes) – but only around the mouth. While this is an interesting result, it creates more questions than it answers! Do these different bacterial profiles provide an adaptive benefit? And if so, for what? In what context is it better to have one over the other? Is it dependent on pathogens in the environment or maybe on diet? Lots of great avenues for future research!

But the authors also found something else when they were looking at MUC7 variation across people, something very curious. As expected, they found a number of different patterns of MUC7. These patterns are called haplotypes and they appear as time goes by and (mostly benign) mutations accumulate along the gene. Generally these haplotypes were pretty similar to each other, but (and this is the weird part!) one of them, haplotype E, was totally different.

Most of the MUC7 haplotypes were like these poodles, small differences but all clearly poodles:

regular_poodles

And then there’s haplotype E:

special_poodle

Yes, still a poodle, but also kind of…out there and unexpected.

So what’s the deal with haplotype E?

Continue reading “Ghost Lineages Ride Again: the Spit Edition”

Anthro News

Chimpanzee super strength!

Things around the blog have been a bit slow with BS&M on its summer hiatus (and me teaching an intensive summer human osteology course), but new anthro papers continue to come out!

What I’ve been reading:

Chimpanzee super strength!
Matthew O’Neill and colleagues tested the claim that chimpanzees are “super strong” relative to modern humans using a combination of actual chimpanzee muscle samples and computer modeling. Spoiler alert – they’re only about 1.35 times stronger than we are, and the reason for this has to do with both muscle fiber type and fiber length. Chimps have more “fast fibers” than we do, along with longer fibers, which the authors suggest make their muscles capable of greater maximum force output and power than ours. This might be beneficial for a large-bodied, arboreal primate. But not all arboreal primates have skeletal muscle dominated by fast fibers; O’Neill et al. also point out that the slow loris has, like we do, muscle that is mostly made up of slow fibers. And, based on their comparisons to other mammals, the authors suggest that our slow, short muscle fibers likely evolved within the hominin lineage, making them a unique characteristic of our group.

So what this means from an evolutionary perspective is that sometime over the last 7-8 million years, potentially coinciding with our shift toward obligate (full-time) upright bipedalism, the architecture of our muscles changed along with our skeleton. This is super cool because soft tissue anatomy isn’t preserved in the fossil record (except in certain rare, extreme conditions, and never in hominins) and this gives us a way to potentially investigate it. I also have some purely self-serving questions/ideas about how this relates to my own research interests, but I think I’ll stay quiet about them for the time being.

In other Anthro News: if you’re in the area and haven’t been, check out the Philadelphia Zoo. They’ve got some very cool primates (omg, red-shanked douc langur) and the Zoo360 Animal Exploration Trails are awesome. The family of gibbons was hanging out in one when I was there and watching the baby do its hilarious little bipedal run up close was incredible.

Reference
O’Neill, M. C., Umberger, B. R., Holowka, N. B., Larson, S. G., & Reiser, P. J. (2017). Chimpanzee super strength and human skeletal muscle evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 201619071.

A Mini-Post & Anthro News

Hominin herpes, European apes, and a fossilized spine

Sometimes a lot of cool stuff happens between BS&M meetings. In an effort to keep up with the constant flow of science and to tide you over until our next discussion, we’re going to try to post mid-week mini-blogs and links to what we’re reading during the week.

This week, Google alerted me to another instance of possible between-species hanky-panky in the fossil record. In a new analysis, Underdown and colleagues attempted to figure out the most likely pathway through which humans got genital herpes (HSV2) from the ancestors of chimpanzees. Yes, you read that right. The closest relative of human HSV2 is not HSV1 (oral herpes), but ChHV1 (the chimpanzee version of herpes). The authors suggest that these two viral lineages split from one another between 1.4 and 3 million years ago, and that either Homo habilis got “proto-HSV2” from the ancestor of modern chimps and gave it to Paranthropus boisei, who then passed it on to Homo erectus, or P. boisei got it directly from the ancestor of modern chimps and transmitted it to H. erectus. (H. erectus is generally considered directly ancestral to Homo sapiens, which is why the virus only has to make it to that species to end up in us.)

Before things get too weird, I want to point out that the authors don’t think that the interspecific hanky-panky went down between either H. habilis or P. boisei and a member of the population of ancestral chimps. They suggest that hunting or scavenging meat from infected chimpanzees would have likely been enough to pass the virus on to one of the hominins, probably via chimp blood coming into contact with an open wound during the butchery process. Once “proto-HSV2” made it into H. habilis or P. boisei, however…

anigif_enhanced-17713-1438816389-2

Anyway. HSV2 now joins HPV (from Neanderthals) and body lice (from some archaic form of Homo) as evidence of ~close~ contact between humans and our hominin cousins (Reed et al. 2004, Pimenoff et al. 2017). The coolest thing about all of this research is that it’s not based directly on fossils or on ancient DNA; you can use things like the evolution of viruses to tell us about our own evolution. Awesome.

Read on for links to what we’ve been nerding out over this week and the references for the herpes paper.
Note: the featured photo is the OH5 cranium of Paranthropus boisei (credit: efossils.org)

Continue reading “A Mini-Post & Anthro News”